Roofing 101 with CertainTeed

As anyone who lives in the Pacific Northwest knows, it is important to have a good roof on your home to protect it from the constant downpour that occurs nine months out of the year. But how many of us really know what's going on under our shingles?

In this post, we're going to peel back the layers to help you understand the different parts of a roof and their functions in keeping your home safe from leaks and ice dams.

First, check out this helpful graphic from CertainTeed:

There are six main elements to a roof, as you saw above. But before any of that goes on, there is a plywood deck that acts as the base for the roof. This needs to be carefully inspected when your roof is being replaced to make sure there are no deficiencies and that none of it is rotting.

1. Waterproof Underlayment

     What is it? A sticky underlayment that goes on the edges of the roof: the valleys, the hips and ridges, the rakes, and the eaves, as well as around any roof penetrations. 

     Why do you need it? It acts as a barrier to prevent water and ice from building up in the eaves and creating an ice dam.

     Why WinterGuard? CertainTeed's WinterGuard® underlayment features a standard adhesive bottom but can be repositioned before deck adhesion. It is available in three finishes: sand, granular, and high tack/high temperature (for keeping shingle, metal, slate, and tile roofs from getting too hot in warmer temperatures). WinterGuard is a "composite material of asphalt polymers, formed into a rolled sheet. The asphalt makes it vapor-tight, and the polymers make the asphalt elastic and sticky", meaning it seals around nails that are driven through it. Check out this video to see WinterGuard in action.

2. Water-resistant Underlayment

     What is it? This is the underlayment that covers and protects the bulk of your roof.

     Why do you need it? Having a water-resistant, but not waterproof, barrier allows moisture to pass through but not water itself. This is what protects your home from anything that gets past the shingles themselves.

     Why DiamondDeck? CertainTeed's DiamondDeck® underlayment is synthetic, made of felt that's been saturated with a asphalt and fiberglass blend. It is scrim-reinforced to improve the protective surface and fully-adhering, meaning less wrinkles for a cleaner, flatter roof surface. An excellent choice for Northern climates, DiamondDeck withstands high winds, so if shingles get blown off, you don't actually need to replace them for up to six months. DiamondDeck holds up better and longer, giving it great value for the cost. You can watch this video to see DiamondDeck as it's applied to a roof.

3. Starter Shingles

     What is it? These are the first shingles to be laid down, hence the name "starter," and they line the edges of the roof.

     Why do you need it? Starter shingles are laid differently than normal shingles, defending the rest of the shingles from wind uplifts along the edge of the roof.

 

Here's another way of looking at the layers:

4. Roof Shingles 

     What is it? These are what most laymen think of when they think of a roof. They are made with a base material, a coating asphalt, a mineral filler, and finally a surfacing material like mineral granules.

     Why do you need it? Shingles are the first line of defence for your roof and home.

     Why CertainTeed? CertainTeed makes architectural shingles, meaning they are significantly sturdier than the 3-tab shingles of the past. They also offer more color options than their competitors and most people prefer their aesthetics to other shingles. In 2005, CertainTeed won the Professional Remodelers Best in Class award for their superior quality roofing system. You can watch CertainTeed shingles being made here. CertainTeed also offers shingles made with their StreakFighter® Algae-Resistant Technology, which you can read about here and here.

5. Hip & Ridge Caps

     What is it? Hips and ridges, as you can see in the diagram above, are the peaks of a roof. They get capped, and the caps then get covered with special shingles to match the roofing shingles and give a nice, finished look to the roof.

     Why do you need it? In order to ensure proper attic ventilation, which we'll explain more in a moment, there should be a 1" gap in the roof at the hips and ridges down to the plywood deck. This then gets covered by a ridge vent to allow proper circulation for warm air coming up from out of the attic. They also add another layer of protection to keep water from getting under the shingles and to keep the wind from blowing your roof off.

6. Roof Ventilation

     What is it? This should really be the number one thing because a lot of it happens before any shingles get laid down. Heat rises, so having proper ventilation is critical to protection your home. This is often in the form of ridge vents (see above) that allow warm air to leave the attic without allowing the outside to get inside.

     Why do you need it? Roofs need to be properly ventilated for a number of reasons: it keeps the framing, insulation, and plywood from being damaged or rotting, and it helps combat potential mold and mildew problems. A properly vented roof will give the shingles a longer life expectancy as well. You can learn more about ventilation herehere, and here.

It is also vital to make sure your roof is properly flashed with drip edge and step flashing to protect the home in the seams of the roofing materials and around the roof's edges. 

 

You can watch a full CertainTeed Integrity Roof System® Installation here

We are a Shingle Master Certified company partnering with CertainTeed Roofing Products to bring the you quality roofing products and installation you deserve. Our Shingle Master Certification allows us to offer a Sure Start Plus 4 Star 50-year warranty


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Choosing the Right Countertop Material for Your Lifestyle

There is an abundance of countertop materials to choose from when renovating your kitchen - marble, quartz, quartzite, soapstone, butcher block, concrete, granite, limestone, laminate, recycled glass, stainless steel, terrazzo, ceramic tile, and even paper composite. But which material is right for you and your lifestyle?

Let's take a look at the pros and cons of some of the most popular materials:

MARBLE

Pros: The look (obviously); marble is as classy as it gets; it's mostly heat durable; and it's timeless so you maintenance aside, you won't want to change it.

Cons: Marble is a porous surface so it will absorb liquids and stain and etch, meaning it needs to be resealed every year or two. It gets nicked, cut, and scratched easily. Plus it's the one of the most expensive materials you can pick for your countertops.

If you watch home improvement shows at all, you've probably heard the phrase "carrara marble" thrown around a lot. Carrara marble is a variety of marble that is one of the highest qualities of marble, and it comes in the typical white and blue-gray color people picture when they think of marble. Marble is absolutely beautiful, but it is also extremely expensive. If you are going for a kitchen that is luxurious, timeless, and more show-than-tell, marble might be the right countertop for you.

QUARTZ

Pros: Quartz is the man-made version of marble, so you get the beauty of the real stuff, combined with great engineering that has gotten rid of the flaws, making quartz stain, scratch, head, acid, and impact resistant. It's also a non-porous surface, so you don't ever have to reseal it - you gotta love low maintenance.

Cons: Like the real thing, quartz can get chipped, particularly on the corners and edges, and the repair work requires a professional.

We here at Square Deal Construction Company love quartz. We always include it as an option in our kitchen remodel estimates because we think it's so great! If you like the look of marble, but you have a budget and you actually use your kitchen on a daily basis, quartz is probably the countertop for you. To see what your kitchen would look like with quartz, check out Cambria's online app DragonVision, or if you have iOS, you can use the Cambria AR app.

GRANITE

Pros: Granite comes in a huge variety of color options and variations, and it can be polished (shiny) or honed (matte). Once it's been sealed, granite is non-porous so it's easy to clean. It's also mostly resistant to heat, cuts, and scratches.

Cons: Needs to be sealed! Seriously, granite absorbs absolutely everything if it's not professionally and properly sealed, and periodically resealed. Another con is how easy it is for the corners to get chipped.

Because they are anything but man-made, granite countertops are one-of-a-kind. If you don't mind a little more maintenance for your counters, and you are possibly interested in more rare colors, granite just might be what you're looking for. You can see what different granite colors look like in a kitchen with the Keystone Kitchen Visualizer.

CONCRETE

Pros: Because concrete is so sturdy, it's almost completely stain, heat, and water resistant, as long as it's been properly sealed. It's also super easy to customize - everything from the thickness to the edges to the color to the finish can be customized.

Cons: Concrete will patina (darken in color) over time and it does require periodic maintenance such as resealing to keep it in tip top shape.

If you're going for a more unique, very stylized aesthetic in your kitchen, concrete might be just the countertop you need.

RECYCLED GLASS

Curava  Recycled Glass Surfaces from  Keystone Granite

Curava Recycled Glass Surfaces from Keystone Granite

Pros: Recycled glass countertops are super unique and fun. They have large pieces of glass to significantly more finely ground pieces. It's also mostly resistant to cuts, scratches, and heat, although that varies by manufacturer.

Cons: The two biggest cons for recycled glass surfaces is that they can stain and how wide a cost range there is.

If you want a more colorful, eco-friendly kitchen, recycled glass is a good way to go, although you should definitely do more research into which manufacturers are better.

BUTCHER BLOCK

Pros: Butcher block brings some often much-needed warmth and character to a kitchen, and it is a great way to have multi-use surfaces. They are also extremely sanitary when they've been properly sealed. 

Cons: Butcher block needs to be sealed and oiled regularly to stay in good condition. It's not a great material to put around a sink because of how wet the sink area usually is, but it's a good option for a counter space near the oven or as an island top. The wood is also susceptible to scratches and dents, just like a regular cutting board.

If you like a more natural look, and you need multi-functional space, you should consider adding some butcher block to your kitchen.

 

You can find more information on countertop materials at these locations: Studio McGee's rundown of countertop surfaces pros and cons; Consumer Reports "Best Countertops for Busy Kitchens" report; Stock Cabinet Express's comparison of granite versus quartz; the Countertop Preview consumer toolbox Countertop Comparison Chart; Jenna Burger's helpful rundown of materials; Zillow's guide; and Lindsay Stephenson's revisit of quartz countertops.


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A Deck for All Seasons

We love capped composite decking materials, and with the ridiculous rise in cedar prices over this last summer, composite decks have become quite competitive in their pricing. But don’t just take our word for it – here are some of the many reasons composite decking is better than wood:

Maintenance

Of course, one of the most important things to consider, second only to how well the deck is actually built, is maintenance. Wood decks require a lot of maintenance. They have to be thoroughly cleaned and re-stained every year to protect against rot and fading. Plus, it needs to be sanded down and re-finished every couple of years. Then you have to check and spray for bugs, and pray that the beetle you just saw running across your deck is in fact a beetle and not a termite. That’s a lot of time you could be doing something more relaxing, like enjoying sitting on your deck. Composite decks do not require more than an hour of maintenance every year – they just need a good soap and water washing once a year.

Eco-friendliness

Composite decking helps the environment. Wood decking means cutting down trees that protect us from carbon dioxide and replenish our oxygen, using more trees to create the energy needed to power the machines that refine the wood and make it construction ready, and having to replant more trees to start the process all over again. Trees are what makes our home here in the Pacific Northwest so stinking beautiful. (Especially like right now at the end of October when the leaves are turning the most brilliant shades of red and orange and yellow and the whole area is just glowing.) Composite decking is mostly made out of recycled plastic materials, keeping them out of dumps. TimberTech advertises that their decking is made from 73% recycled materials, and Trex’s is 95% recycled materials. You can learn more about turning plastic into composite decking in this Trex video and this Fiberon video.

Sturdiness

Wood decks splinter and twist and rot and warp. Composite decks do not. Plus, composite decking is more weather-resistant. Wood decking materials last at most 10-15 years. Composite decking materials last at least 25 years and longer if you take good care of them. That’s almost twice as long! And considering cedar and composite materials are running about the same price-wise right now, you end up getting so much more for your money’s worth with composite decking – a longer lifetime with significantly less maintenance time.

The Look

If the only thing holding you back from going with composite rather than wood is that you are afraid it won’t look like real wood, please come into our office and let us show you the 30+ samples of composite decking we have from four different companies that are designed with a wood grain finish. (Or just look at these samples on Trex’s website.) Composite decking has the look of real wood, without the hazards and dangers of real wood. And you don’t have to stain it to get it the color you want. Plus, most composite decking materials have color all throughout the material, rather than slathering on a coating at the end, so you don’t have to worry about fading or staining.

Let us know your thoughts on capped composite decking in the comments below.


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75 Things to Do in McMinnville, Oregon

Our nearby neighbor McMinnville is the seat of the county - and the talk of the town! Here are 75 things to do, see, eat, drink, and shop in the area:

DO:

1. See a local performance at Gallery Theater

2. Tour Linfield and watch a game or performance

3. Take the little ones to Story Time at the McMinnville Public Library

4. Have teens? Join Teen Gaming Night on the first Friday of each month

5. Explore nature a mere 5 minutes out of town at Ed Grenfell Park

6. Visit Oregon’s Favorite Main Street, which, ironically, is actually on Third Street

7. See Howard Hughes’ Spruce Goose at Evergreen Aviation and Space Museum, and while you’re there, be sure to check out the IMAX Theater and Waterpark

8. If you are around in May, be sure to check out the annual UFO Festival

9. Thursdays from May to October you can find a plethora of local vendors at the Farmers Market

10. July through September, after Farmers Market, head further down Third Street for free Concerts on the Plaza

11. Check out the fantastic wooden structures of City Park

12. Or go for a dive at the nearby Aquatic Center

13. Join the Art and Wine Walk on the third Saturday of every month

14. Find out just how much of turkey you are at the annual Turkey Rama Festival

15. Learn more about the 100+ years of history on a walking tour of downtown

16. Watch the latest blockbuster at Moonlight Theater

17. Rent a bicycle and tootle around a bit

18. Visit us in July for the International Pinot Noir Celebration

19. Take a pottery lesson at Jack Potter Art Lounge

20. Spend the holiday season with us and enjoy the Parade and Tree Lighting Festival

21. Drop by in August to go to Oregon’s Oldest Fair

22. See some cool classic cars at Drag the Gut

23. Learn more about local history at the Heritage Museum

24. Go for a hike near the airport at Galen McBee

25. Learn more about local ancient geology at Erratic Rock

26. Go on a wine tour by helicopter with Konect Aviation

27. Get wet in the fountains at Discovery Meadows

28. Take a jewelry making class at Jack of All Beads

29. Watch local artists perform at Mac Stage 

EAT & DRINK:

1. Enjoy fine dining farm-to-fork at Thistle

2. Get a drink at The Oak

3. Try a Latin meal from Pura Vida

4. Indulge in a scoop (or two) from Serendipity Ice Cream

5. Partake in tapas at La Rambla

6. Have a taste of New Orleans at Gem

7. Satisfy your sweet tooth with a pastry from Red Fox Bakery

8. Eat some amazing BBQ at Ribslayer

9. Enjoy a freshly made sandwich and soup at The Sage

10. Visit one of the many wineries in the area

11. Spend a meal at 1882 Grille, featured in Sunset Magazine

12. Munch on some yummy pizza from 3rd Street Pizza (P.S. Mondays & Tuesdays are Dollar-Slice Days)

13. Find an afternoon pick-me-up at Union Block

14. Or if tea is more your style, check out Velvet Monkey

15. Sample some local brews at Grain Station

16. Enjoy some local produce from Harvest Fresh

17. Get Mexican at Los Molcajetes

18. Embrace weird at McMenamins Hotel Oregon restaurant and bar

19. Chill out at Nick’s Italian Café

20. Grab a pint at Golden Valley

21. Eat hearty at The 411

22. End your day bitterly at The Bitter Monk

23. Join the community at Community Plate

24. Have a real live monkey watch you eat at Alf’s

25. Indulge in carbs at Great Harvest Bread Co

26. Enjoy breakfast at WildWoodCrescent Café, or Morning Thunder - you can’t go wrong!

SHOP:

1. Find all the yarn you could ever dream of at Oregon Kitting Co

2. Buy a bunch of flowers at Poseyland

3. Experience the charm of Third Street Books

4. Bring back something for everyone from Third Street Oil & Vinegar

5. Check out the local cycling culture at Tommy’s

6. Purchase something sparkly for her from Accessory Appeal

7. See some of the cutest clothes around at Cupcake Couture

8. Buy local at Yamhill Valley Dry Goods

9. Indulge your music snobbery with some vinyl from The Vortex

10. Visit “McMinnville’s Back Yard” in the Granary District

11. Find cute curios at Heavens to Betsy

12. Bring your inner child to life at Hopscotch Toys

13. Make your home a little more beautiful with finds from La Bella Casa

14. Be sure to stop by The Merri Artist for all your art supply dreams come true

15. Purchase some feminine fineries at Mes Amies

16. Bring home a taste of the Pacific Northwest from NW Food & Gifts

17. See more fabric than you could dream of at Boersma’s

18. Enjoy the eclectic offerings of Found Objects

19. Get some sweet deals from Real Deals on Home Décor

20. Find all your garden needs (and more!) at Incahoots

Just make sure that wherever you end up shopping, you bring your own reusable bags with you.


*Square Deal Construction Company does not necessarily endorse these companies.


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FAQs

1. What happens when you come out to my house to give me an estimate?

The intention of the first meeting is just for us to meet, go over the project, get a feel for what the project consists of and what your expectations are. We will discuss your budget and types of finishes you would like. Sometimes the budget doesn’t allow for the desired finishes, in which case we can talk about alternate solutions. Depending on the complexity of the project, we can come up with an estimate during our visit. Other times, the estimator will need to leave, do some research, and get back to you with an estimate. Once this process is complete, and you feel comfortable working with Square Deal, we would start the process of creating a formal proposal. This will include all the specs for the job, to include, types of trim, flooring, siding, windows, roofing, cabinetry, countertops, faucets, etc. With this information, we can create an accurate lump sum proposal. We try very hard to account for every aspect and not use budgets for items like some companies do. This is more work in the beginning, but it allows the project to flow more efficiently and it reduces the surprise cost overruns by the end of the project. Often times we will need construction drawings to allow us to bid the project accurately.

 

2. I’m not sure what I want my project to look like exactly. Can you help me with that?

We have an in house Architectural and Interior Designer, who can create these drawings and assist you with all of the design and selection aspects of your project, if you need or would like help with this. Our fee for this service starts with another design consultation at $65 per hour with a two-hour minimum. Based on the information gathered from that meeting, we will prepare a proposal for the design work and construction drawings. These designs and drawings will be yours even if you choose not to use us to do the project.

 

3. What if I want to accept your estimate, but I’m not ready for you to start my project yet?

If you decide to go with Square Deal but aren’t ready to start your project until next year, we will just keep your proposal in our file and rebid at the time when you want to start the project. We are normally 3 months +/- out on larger projects.